Goodwood Raceway Mercedes-Benz Classic Racing Cars







Published by Gerald Ferreira Date: March 14, 2014
Categories:

  • Goodwood Press Day 2014: Mercedes-Benz Classic recalls victories from 120 years of motor sport
  • Mercedes Grand Prix racing car of 1914 is a highlight at the 2014 Goodwood Press Day and recalls the first one-two-three win in motor racing history
  • Goodwood Festival of Speed 2014: “Addicted to Winning” and 120 years of Mercedes-Benz motor racing history – a perfect match

Goodwood_Raceway

“Addicted to Winning – The Unbeatable Champions of Motor Sport” is the theme of the 2014 Goodwood Festival of Speed. The excitement of competition and the fascination of winning describe the spirit of the magical moments from 120 years of Mercedes-Benz motor racing history.

Mercedes-Benz is set to make this unique history, shaped both by people and vehicles, come alive at the Goodwood Festival of Speed with a host of original racing cars from the company’s collection. On 20 March 2014, the Goodwood Press Day on the premises of the Bonhams auction house in London will give an exclusive preview of the Festival, which will take place from 26 to 29 June 2014 at the country estate of the Earl of March at Kinrara in Sussex, Goodwood House. At the 2013 Festival of Speed Bonhams auctioned off an original Mercedes-Benz W 196 R Grand Prix racing car for a record sum, the equivalent of US$ 31.6 million.

The one-two-three victory scored by the Mercedes Grand Prix racing car in the 1914 French Grand Prix or the dominance of the Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows during the 1930s and 1950s: the Goodwood Festival of Speed 2014 brings these and other legendary chapters of motor racing under the Mercedes star back to life. “The Festival of Speed is a premier event on the international classic automobile calendar. Mercedes-Benz attaches particular importance to putting in a strong appearance at Goodwood, one reason being that the motto for 2014 reflects the key message from 120 years of Mercedes-Benz motor sport in an exceptional way,” says Michael Bock, Head of Mercedes-Benz Classic.

At the Goodwood Press Day in London the brand will use the Mercedes Grand Prix racing car of 1914 to convey the fascination of motor sport history. The Grand Prix racing car stands for a stunning one-two-three victory at the French Grand Prix in Lyon in 1914.

Historical racing cars from the Mercedes-Benz Classic collection and racing drivers doubling as brand ambassadors are regular guests at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. They present themselves to the spectators before the extraordinary backdrop of Goodwood House, built in the 18th century.

The magic of motor racing history

The Goodwood Festival of Speed, affectionately dubbed “the largest motoring garden party in the world”, brings together competition vehicles and sports cars of all periods for three days. The result is a grandiose symphony of motor sport in which the theme “120 years of Mercedes-Benz motor sport” is an outstanding leitmotif in 2014.

“For me it is always magical to see so many of the world's greatest drivers, riders and machines in action up my 1.16-mile drive,” says Lord March, who inaugurated the Festival of Speed at his country estate more than 20 years ago.

The 1914 Mercedes Grand Prix racing car

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On 4 July 1914, Mercedes celebrated a triumphant one-two-three victory in the French Grand Prix by Christian Lautenschlager, Louis Wagner, and Otto Salzer. The vehicle entered by Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft in the race on the 37.6-kilometre circuit south of Lyon was its newly developed Grand Prix racing car. Some 20 laps over the tricky course, or a good 750 kilometres, were the order of the day, and Mercedes was up against apparently almost unassailable competition – above all in the guise of Peugeot and Delage from France, Sunbeam from England, and Fiat from Italy. Theodor Pilette and Max Sailer were forced to retire with technical problems, but Christian Lautenschlager, Louis Wagner, and Otto Salzer took the remaining cars on to finish the race at the front of the field after more than 7 hours: the first one-two-three victory in the history of motor sport had been achieved.

As the regulations limited engine displacement to 4.5 litres for the first time, Mercedes developed an entirely new four-cylinder engine with an overhead camshaft and two inlet and exhaust valves per cylinder – the first use of a four-valve-per-cylinder design in a Mercedes engine. The racing engine delivered a peak output of 78 kW (106 hp) at a – quite literally – revolutionary 3,100 rpm.

  • Technical data of the Mercedes Grand Prix racing car
  • Period of use: 1914-1922
  • Cylinders: 4/in-line
  • Displacement: 4,483 cubic centimetres
  • Output: 78 kW (106 hp)
  • Top speed: 180 km/h