Dakar 2013 – Hino Trucks Finish for the 22nd Time







Published by Gerald Ferreira Date: January 22, 2013
Categories: Hino

HINO NOTCHES UP 22nd CONSECUTIVE FINISH IN DAKAR RALLY

Dakar 2013 Hino

Hino, the leading Japanese truck manufacturer and the first one from that country to enter the gruelling Dakar Rally, way back in 1991, notched up its 22nd consecutive finish in the 2013 edition of this gruelling cross-country race which finished in Santiago, Chile, on January 20. The two-truck Hino Team Sugawara once again had a 100% finishing record.

“We are delighted at yet another display of reliability and durability by Hino trucks in the toughest, regular test for this type of vehicle in open competition in the world,” commented the vice president of Hino SA, Dr. Casper Kruger.

 “The two trucks entered by Team Sugawara were once again the only representatives from the Japanese truck industry to participate in this two-week marathon across some of the world’s most desolate regions. The strong performance also served to underline Hino’s competitive spirit and technological resources.”

The four-wheel drive Hino 500-Series truck crewed by Teruhito Sugawara and Hiroyuki Sugiura, of Japan, finished 19th overall out of the 60 finishers from an original field of 74 trucks and won the Dakar Challenge for trucks with an engine capacity of less than 10 litres. This was the 13th time Hino has won this award in the 14 times it has been contested since 1996.

The second Hino, crewed by Teruhito’s 71-year-old father, Yoshimasa, and navigator Katsumi Hamura, placed 31st overall and third in the under 10-litre Challenge.

What makes the Dakar Rally a David and Goliath contest in the truck category is the fact that the Hino uses a production-based six-cylinder intercooled turbocharged engine of 7 961cm3  while most of its rivals are in the “monster” category with much larger capacity engines developed specifically for this annual race.

This year’s route, which started and finished in Lima, Peru, and went into Argentina before the finish in Santiago, Chile, was 8 121km in length, with 3 541km of the route making up the 13 timed special stages. The route crossed the Andes twice and at times the altitude was over 3 000m which was taxing on the crews and power sapping for the vehicles.

Hino, Liaz and Ginaf were the only three makes with a 100% finishing record in this year’s race out of a field that included Kamaz, MAN, Mercedes-Benz, DAF, Renault, Iveco, Maz and Tatra trucks.

Interestingly the second Dakar in which Hino participated finished in Cape Town after starting in Paris, with the Japanese trucks in 4th, 5th, 6th and 10th positions. The big breakthrough came in 1994 with a second position overall. This achievement was repeated in 1995, 1997, 1998, 2001 and 2005.

The most successful year for Hino was 1997 when it became the first and until last year the only maker to take the first three places overall in the truck category when the route went from Dakar to Agades and back to Dakar. In 2011 Kamaz, of Russia, became the second truck maker to register a 1-2-3 finish and repeated this feat in 2013.

This year Hino continued its long association with Team Sugawara, which is headed up by Yoshimasa Sugawara, who holds the record for the most consecutive entries in the Dakar Rally at 30. He is the only Japanese to have competed in this epic race on a motorcycle and quad as well as in a car and truck. Now 70 years of age he holds the record for the most consecutive finishes in the Dakar Rally at 22. His son, Teruhito, contested the Dakar Rally for the 15th time in this year’s race and this was only the second time he has finished out of the top 10.

HINO’S PROUD RECORD:

Hino’s has a proud record in long distance rally-raids over 21 years and none of the factory-supported Hino's has had to withdraw from the event due to mechanical failure.

1991 Paris-Dakar: Four starters and three trucks finished 7th, 10th and 14th (out of 109 trucks entered and 44 finishers). The fourth Hino completed the course unofficially, as the driver had to be replaced when he was badly injured in a tyre-changing accident.

1992 Paris-Sirte-Le Cap (which finished in Cape Town): Four trucks entered and they finished 4th, 5th, 6th and 10th in the Camion class.

1992 Paris-Moscow-Beijing: One starter and one finisher, in 6th position.

1993 Paris-Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 6th place, out of 28 finishers from an original field of 43 trucks.

1994 Paris-Dakar-Paris: One starter and one finisher, in 2nd place out of 10 finishers, from 29 starters in the truck category.

1995 Granada-Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 2nd place out of 20 finishers from 60 starters in the truck category.

1996 Granada-Dakar: Two starters and two finishers, in 6th and 11th places, from the 70 trucks that started from Granada. (Winner of under 10-litre category)

1997 Dakar-Agades-Dakar: Three starters and three finishers, in 1st, 2nd and 3rd places over – a feat never achieved by any truck maker previously and it was only equalled by Kamaz in 2011 and repeated in 2013. (1, 2, 3 in under 10-litre category).

1998 Paris-Granada-Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 2nd place. (Winner of under 10-litre category).

1999 Granada-Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 4th place, out of the 16 trucks (from an original field of 29 trucks) that made it to the end. (Winner of under 10-litre category).

2000 Dakar-Cairo: One starter and one finisher, in 5th place, out of 23 trucks (from an original field of 66) that made it to the finish. (Winner of under 10-litre category).

2001 Paris-Dakar: Two starters and one finisher, in 2nd place, out of 12 trucks (from an original field of 30) that made it to the finish. (Winner of under 10-litre capacity). The truck that retired with gearbox failure was a private entry and not factory-supported.

2002 Paris-Madrid-Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 3rd place, out of 15 trucks (from an original field of 34) that made it to the finish. (Winner of under 10-litre category).

2003 Telefonica Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 5th place, out of 27 trucks (from an original field of 49) that made it to the finish.

2004 Telefonica Dakar: One starter and one finisher, in 5th place, out of 38 trucks (from an original field of 62) that made it to the finish.

2005 Telefonica Dakar: Two starters and two finishers, in 2nd and 5th places, out of 36 trucks (from an original field of 69) that made it to the finish. (Winner of under 10-litre category).

2006 Lisbon-Dakar: Two starters and two finishers, in 5th and 7th places, out of 35 trucks (from an original field of 69) that made it to the finish.

2007 Lisbon-Dakar: Two starters and two finishers, in 9th and 13th places, out of 59 trucks (from an original field of 85) that made it to the finish. (Winner of under 10-litre category)

2008 Lisbon-Dakar: The race was cancelled at the last minute due to terrorist threats in North Africa.

2009 Dakar Argentina-Chile: Two starters and two finishers in 14th and 26th positions out of 54 trucks (from an original field of 81) that made it to the finish. (Second in under 10-litre category).

2010 Dakar Argentina-Chile: Two starters and one finisher in 7th position out of 28 trucks (from an original field of 54) that made it to the finish. Winner of the Production Series truck category and under 10-litre engine capacity class. The second Hino Team Sugawara entry was disqualified for missing a check-point.

2011 Dakar Argentina-Chile: Two starters and two finishers in 9th and 13th positions out of 41 finishers from an original field of 66. Winner of the Production Series truck category and under 10-litre category.

2012 Dakar Argentina-Chile-Peru: Two starters and two finishers in 9th and 24th position out of 60 finishers from an original field of 73. Winner of the under 10-litre engine category

2013 Dakar Peru-Argentina-Chile: Two starters and two finishers in 19th and 31st position overall out of 60 finishers from an original field of 74 starters. Winner of the Dakar Challenge for trucks with an engine capacity under 10 litres.